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Dancer Gayatri Sriram
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Gayatri Sriram’s France performance
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Gayatri Sriram’s Bharatanatyam performance
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Mukti Marga in Dharani Festival
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Gayatri Pendant la thillana
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Living through dance
http://m.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/living-through-dance/article7685421.ece








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Coverage on Dancer Gayatri Sriram in andhra Jyoti
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Natya Vedam
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Gayatri cover Life
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Rendered With Poise and Grace
http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/chennai/Rendered-With-Poise-and-Grace/2015/02/09/article2659037.ece








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A heart-felt evening
http://www.sundaytimes.lk/140921/plus/a-heart-felt-evening-118555.html








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Asian Festival of Classical
http://www.sundaytimes.lk/140914/magazine/dancing-with-elan-and-passion-116977.html








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A dance tribute
Review by The Hindu

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New Indian Express review on GAD
http://m.newindianexpress.com/on-stage/336655

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Bharata Natyam NCPA Mumbai
http://www.afternoondc.in/culture/gayatris-elevating-performance/article_115478








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Guimet
http://www.guimet.fr/fr/auditorium/spectacles/gayatri-sriram-et-ses-musiciens

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Kala Nadam Festival Bangalore
http://artscomments.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/gayatri-sriram-is-beautiful-graceful-and-mesmerising/







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South Africa performances at Johannesburg
http://artscomments.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/gayatri-sriram-is-beautiful-graceful-and-mesmerising/







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Gayatri Sriram at Mandapa:
http://www.umoove.fr/index.php/accueil-umoove-danse-spectacle/jass-autres-styles/1407-gayatri-sriram-a-mandapa

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Narrating a story through dance: http://newindianexpress.com/cities/bangalore/Narrating-a-story-through-dance/2013/07/29/article1706509.ece

Good artistes should possess the skills of translating artistry into performance. Tight schedules have resulted in artistes adopting shorter formats. This to an extent has affected the art form concerned and is particularly true in the case of Bharatanatyam. We seldom come across fully detailed elaborations of compositions. Only in longer versions does the right technique come through.

Calm and smooth

Pure traditionalism pervaded the two dance recitals held under the banner of International Art and Culture Foundation led by Photo-journalist Srivatsa Shandilya at the Khimcha auditorium on Sunday. Experienced Bharatanatyam artiste Gayathri Sriram of Singapore and a scholar cum Bharatanatyam expert Dr Sowndarya Srivatsa were the triumphant dancers. Both of them performed with conviction, showcasing their maturity as performers. Their ability to exude calm while moving smoothly through the space drew our attention.

Gayathri’s dance was enlivened by the musical support extended by her Guru Minal Prabhu(nattuvanga), Karthik Hebbar(vocal) and others. The Pushpanjali was laced with the rendition of Krishna ena baarade. In the spread out of Kaanada

varna Endu kayuve, the nritta,

nrithya and abhinaya spoke of her skillfulness and remarkable hold over laya. Her abhinaya was further solidified  in the enactment of Jayadeva’s Ashtapadi Yahi Madhava(Sindhubhairavi). The popular Tamil pada Vishamakkara Kannan had an intimate portrayal.

Admirable display of talent

Dr Sowndarya who has been

recently awarded the doctoral degree from the Bangalore University for her thesis on dance, rendered the Gambheer Nata Kannada varna in a memorable manner and gave an admirable display of unifying movement in toto. The dancer’s prowess embellished her power-packed nritta passages and expressions. Sparks of exceptional mime came forth in the impersonation of a Kannada poem (Howdene) by the veteran poet Dr G SShivarudrappa.

The concluding Durga tillana was another delightful interpretation.

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In love with dance: http://www.thehindu.com/arts/dance/in-love-with-dance/article4030591.ece

Gayatri Sriram enjoys every moment she practises and performs Bharatnatyam. “I adore dance, I enjoy the process,” says the graceful dancer. Gayatri, trained in the Kalakshetra tradition, was in the capital city to give her first ever performance in Kerala in connection with the 40th Dance and Music Festival organised by Regatta Cultural Society.

Gayatri, who has her roots in Kerala, has been living in Singapore for the last 15 years, where she has a dance school called Shruti Laya School of Dance. She is a recipient of the Rukmini Devi Arundale endowment award 2012 instituted by Sri Krishna Gana Sabha Chennai. Excerpts from an interview with the dancer…

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Adherence to tradition: http://www.thehindu.com/arts/dance/adherence-to-tradition/article3451822.ece

The Natya Vedam Annual Dance Festival 2012 was organised in Bangalore recently by Deepa Sashindran as tribute to her guru Kuchipudi exponent Manju Barggavee. The second and concluding day of the Festival began with a thematic Bharathanatya recital by Gayatri Sriram, titled “Seetha Svagatham”.

The presentation was a portrayal of Seetha's recollections of past events, their causes and consequences, just before she is taken to the forest and abandoned there. Most of the major occurrences of the Ramayana, such as the wedding of Rama and Seetha, life in Panchavati, Seetha's abduction and so on were delineated from her perspective. Subsequent developments including the sojourn in Valmiki's ashram, and the birth of the twins Lava and Kusha culminate in the protagonist's return to Mother Earth.

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http://www.narthaki.com/info/gtsk/gtsk54.html

The finale Yagyaseni, the one born of the sacrificial fire, solo Bharatanatyam by Gayatri Sriram was the last presentation with which the festival came to a close. Trained by Kalakshetra alumnus Guru Minal Prabhu in Kalakshetra bani, and with thorough grooming, which brought her recently the coveted Rukmini Devi Award from Krishna Gana Sabha, Gayatri has a commanding stage presence and one at once notices that here is a dancer, who, once she is on the stage, performs with élan and passion. With a svelte figure, long arms which weave geometrical patterns, straight lines, diagonals and builds up the architectonic beauty of the Bharatanatyam form, Gayatri seemed all immersed in the role of Draupadi, described by the author Pavan K Verma in his book 'Yudhisthar and Draupadi' as 'Divya parimalayukta, Soundarya ati sundari, Sakalaaloka sarvottam Kanya Yagyaseni'.

Doubtless there was a fire in her dancing epitomizing the character of Yagyaseni. Using the ploy of conversation between her best friend, Sakha Krishna and herself, Gayatri has explored the various facets of Draupadi's personality, avoiding the clichés, raising questions like who was Yagyaseni? Why did fire surround her always? Who was Krishna to her? Selecting some passages from Pavan K Verma's text for dance in a non-Margam format, Gayatri performed it with panache, unfolding various layers of Draupadi's personality and also throwing light on her relationship with her five husbands.

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Remarkable team work: http://www.thehindu.com/features/friday-review/dance/myriad-themes-well-presented/article2573805.ece

Gayathri Sriram's 'Panchakanya' was classy.

The very concept of 'Panchakanya' glorifies the courage of the five women - Ahalya, Tara, Draupadi, Mandodhari and Sita - who suffered a lot but kept their dignity.

The beautiful Ahalya deceived by Indra and cursed by her husband; the astute Tara who supported her husband Vali, but married his brother Sugreeva after he was killed in order to keep peace in the kingdom; Princess Draupadi, who was let down by all her five husbands but protected her honour with her own devotion; Mandodhari, the wife of Ravana who was devoted to him in spite of his wandering ways; and Sita, a symbol of purity who had to suffer ignominy in spite of proving her chastity by entering into the fire. Gayathri infused life into those characters on stage.

The demanding standards of Guru Minal Prabhu's choreography were met with ease by the brilliant disciple.

Minal Prabhu (Nattuvangam), Balasubramania Sharma (vocal support), Gurumurthy (mridangam), Narasimhamurthy (flute) and Srinivas (sitar) deserve kudos for their remarkable team effort. The excellent introduction too had a big role in making the presentation more impressive.

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Competent moves: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/article2323189.ece

REVIEW Rajashree Warrier and Gayatri Sriram presented some good dance moments

Convincing Rajashree Warrier Photo Murali Kumar K.

"P anchakanya", a thematic Bharatanatya performance by Gayatri Sriram based on five women from the Ramayana and the Mahabharatha, was organised recently by Ananya, Bangalore.

While Ahalya, the first of the characters, wife of sage Gauthama was shown to be an epitome of beauty and virtue, and an unsuspecting victim of Indra's wiles, Tara, the next, was depicted as the wise and perceptive royal consort of the Vanara king Bali, both drawn from the Ramayana. The dignity and individuality of Draupadi from the Mahabharatha, wife to the Pandavas, and the grace and astuteness of Ravana's queen Mandodari were effectively highlighted, with a narration Seeta's purity, strength and resolve bringing the evening to a close.

The recital, choreographed by the artiste's guru Minal Prabhu who also wielded the cymbals, was divided into five segments, each of which began with an introductory Sanskrit verse and dwelt on the distinct personalities of the protagonists. The artiste donned many roles with equal felicity during the narration of events, with intervening nritta passages featuring a scintillating variety of rhythms neatly executed. Though some of the episodes are worthy of more detailed exploration, the characters were portrayed as living entities with a timeless quality and not mere shadowy figures of myth and legend. Their dilemmas and emotions were projected succinctly, yet convincingly, and moving moments such as Seeta's final departure were presented with restraint. Balasubramanya Sharma (vocal), G. Gurumurthy (mridanga), Mahesh Swamy (flute), Dayakar (violin) and Suma Rani (sitar), provided excellent orchestral support, with lyrics by Lakshmi Satyanarayana.

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Riveting recitals: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/riveting-recitals/article4223701.ece

'Yagyaseni' was a thematic Bharathanatya presentation by Gayatri Sriram, who performed on the same day. Episodes and anecdotes from the life of Draupadi unfolded on stage, as recollected by the central character after the Mahabharatha war. Running through the whole was a conversation with Krishna, binding the narrative which used lyrics and instrumental music as well as English verses to highlight the subject. The central character's fiery advent, her swayamvara and subsequent marriage to all five of the Pandavas, her relationship to each one of them, and the tumultuous events of her life were enacted with sensitivity, great emotive skills and a fine command over technique. The depiction of the young bride, unaware of the travails to follow, her initial shock and revulsion at having to accept five husbands, and her perspective to events such as the dice game, and Yudhishthira's righteousness in requesting that Nakula be revived after all four brothers perish at the forest pool, were portrayed convincingly and augmented by subtle lighting. Minal Prabhu (nattuvanga) led the excellent orchestra comprising Balasubramanya Sharma (vocal), G.G. Gurumurthy (mridanga), Jayaram (flute), Suma Rani (sitar) and Karthik Datar (rhythm pads).

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Portraying the power of women: http://www.deccanherald.com/content/180610/ipl-2012.html

The final character, Sita, is lissome, tiny, graceful and extremely beautiful. She captivates the attention of Rama with her skill and courage. The dance depicts her kidnapping, banishment and eventually her death in the arms of mother earth.

The chief guest and dancer Bhanumati, said, “The last scene brought tears to my eyes. Gayatri has played each character so clearly and beautifully.”

Gayatri Sriram excelled as she played all the five women and also the supporting characters of each story. The beautiful and graceful dancer set the stage on fire and left the audience mesmerised with her stunning performances.

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Grand premier of Yagyaseni: http://newindianexpress.com/cities/bangalore/article1391757.ece

The premier of Yagyaseni (another name of Draupadi), a solo presentation of a work choreographed by young, talented, ambitious and zealous Bharatanatya dancer Gayathri Sriram of Singapore was a grand success and won the approval of the packed rasikas. Inspiringly backed up by Guru Minal Prabhu(this year's winner of the Karnataka Sangeetha Nrithya Academy award on nattuvanga), Sharma (music and vocal), Gurumurthy(mridanga) and Jayaram (flute), Gayathri explored the changing emotional highs and lows of a woman. With Draupadi as the pivotal character the dance visualisation of her saga full of travails and trauma, her notions about the Pandavas and their traits and behaviour et al, in the form of a dialogue between her and Krishna, carried all the feel for poetry and passion. A deep seated serenity even in the tortured moments, sensitivity and a consciousness of woman's vulnerability and generosity which can be exploited could be sensed throughout in the execution of the piece. With her beautifully balanced body, Gayathri moved with the centered poise and grace and also demonstrated the capacity for deep inner involvement which however never lost control. Delightful in the portrayal and aided by the voiceovers (Krishna and Draupadi dialogue) the rendition made the audience glued to their seats. The presentation began with an Agni Jathi and interspersed with Pavan Verma's sonnets. There was no dull moment. It ended with a mangala to Yagyaseni and Krishna.

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http://www.expatliving.sg/article/things-to-do/stage-culture/its-time-for-indian-classical-dance-to-shine-on-stage

http://www.timeoutbengaluru.net/dance/features/myth-appropriation

http://www.thehindu.com/arts/dance/rare-and-riveting/article3942258.ece?css=print

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/175658/a-different-take-epic.html